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BCSS Welcome

Discover the beauty of cacti and other succulents with the BCSS! Whether you are an expert grower or a novice – or are just thinking of starting up the hobby – the Society will guide you all the way.

With over 80 branches throughout the UK meeting monthly you will have the opportunity to meet other enthusiasts and to learn more about growing these amazing plants. CactusWorld, the Society’s beautifully illustrated quarterly magazine is just one of the many benefits that members receive. It contains articles about new species, plants in the wild, cultivation techniques and, of course, what the Society’s many branches and members are up to.

This website offers a wealth of information about the Society – including how to join – and is your gateway to the wonderful world of cacti and other succulents.

 

Come and join us!

CactusWorld 01/2007
BCSS Journal 01/2007
Quantity:
Journal 01/2007 | 4.5 GBP
aa  MARCH 2007 CONTENTS:
  • Editor's comments by Roy Mottram
  • Fascinating Frailea, Part I : General impressions by Marlon C Machado
  • A new species of Aloe (Asphodelaceae) from northernmost Madagascar by Jean-Bernard Castillon
  • Visiting Ferocactus cylindraceus by Roy Thackeray
  • Pink-flowered astrophytums by David Quail
  • The genus Rhipsalis by A J S McMillan
  • Contributions to the flora of the Canary Islands - Part I by Brian Fearn
  • Mammillaria luethyi by Jim Ring
  • Mammillarias in reverse - Part 3 by John Pilbeam
  • The recent discovery of the first wild population of Moringa hildebrandtii (Moringaceae) in Madagascar by J-B Castillon & J-P Castillon
  • A visit to Senegal, West Africa by Peter Bruyns
  • CactusTalk
  • Literature review
  • Round Robins Report by Malcolm Holloway

Front cover: Frailea castenea This widespread species from southern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and northern Uruguay is popular with collectors and easily grown from seed. Fraileas don't often open their flowers, but you stand the best chance of seeing them with their gorgeous, golden flowers open in the heat of high summer, after a watering early in the day so that the humidity is high, and even better if the weather itself is thundery and sultry. Mid-afternoon is when you are most likely to find them open. Photo: Marlon Machado.

     
CactusWorld 02/2007
BCSS Journal 02/2007
Quantity:
Journal 02/2007 | 4.5 GBP
  JUNE 2007 CONTENTS:
  • Editor's comments by Roy Mottram
  • Fascinating Frailea, Part I : General impressions by Marlon C Machado
  • A new species of Aloe (Asphodelaceae) from northernmost Madagascar by Jean-Bernard Castillon
  • Visiting Ferocactus cylindraceus by Roy Thackeray
  • Pink-flowered astrophytums by David Quail
  • The genus Rhipsalis by A J S McMillan
  • Contributions to the flora of the Canary Islands - Part I by Brian Fearn
  • Mammillaria luethyi by Jim Ring
  • Mammillarias in reverse - Part 3 by John Pilbeam
  • The recent discovery of the first wild population of Moringa hildebrandtii (Moringaceae) in Madagascar by J-B Castillon & J-P Castillon
  • A visit to Senegal, West Africa by Peter Bruyns
  • CactusTalk
  • Literature review
  • Round Robins Report by Malcolm Holloway

Front cover: Frailea castenea This widespread species from southern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and northern Uruguay is popular with collectors and easily grown from seed. Fraileas don't often open their flowers, but you stand the best chance of seeing them with their gorgeous, golden flowers open in the heat of high summer, after a watering early in the day so that the humidity is high, and even better if the weather itself is thundery and sultry. Mid-afternoon is when you are most likely to find them open. Photo: Marlon Machado.

     
CactusWorld 03/2007
BCSS Journal 04/2007
Quantity:
Journal 03/2007 | 4.5 GBP
  SEPTEMBER 2007 CONTENTS:
  • The Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden by Root Gorelic
  • Two new species of Ethiopian aloes by Tom McCoy & John Lavranos
  • Astrophytum caput-medusae in cultivation by René Zahra
  • Cintia knizei: A taxonomic review by Jan Řiha
  • Getting close to Aeonium glandulosum by Roy Thackeray
  • Life in a quartz field - from a Shmoo-Plant's point of view by Rogan B Roth
  • Gymnocalycium - an alphabetical review: part 3, C-D by John Pilbeam
  • CactusTalk
  • Literature Review
  • Outstanding but overlooked: E. hesteri ssp. grata (M Kaplan, L Kunte & J Šnicer) J Lüthy & Dicht from Coahuila, Mexico by Jonas Lüthy & Reto Dicht

Front cover: Ferocactus histrix with Agave lechuguilla and a glimpse of a monstrose Pachycereus schottii in the background. This photo was taken by Root Gorelick in the Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden and shows a very large, mature plant, quite different in appearance to the seedlings, which have only a few strong ribs. At that stage they are very appealing and easy, so it is one of those species raised and sold in very large numbers in Europe, and a good choice for new collectors. Once they get older, they do seem to run out of steam and become steadily more fussy in their requirements, so mature examples are rarely seen in glasshouses. They do enjoy generous treatment, but must also have the best drainage, which is more difficult to achieve with larger plants.

     
CactusWorld 04/2007
BCSS Journal 04/2007
Quantity:
Journal 04/2007 | 4.5 GBP
 

DECEMBER 2007 CONTENTS:

  • Lithops scrapbook: part I by Keith Green
  • The voice of experience: a guide to cultivation specially for newcomers and juniors by John Carr
  • Growing agaves in Melbourne by Robert D Stephenson
  • Two significant new aloes from Kenya by Tom McCoy & John Lavranos
  • Seed Offer 2007/2008 by David Rushforth
  • Cacti of the Cahete river basin, Lima, Peru: a research and conservation study by Dr Carlos Ostolaza (SPECS), Aldo Ceroni MSc (UNALM), Jonatan Zapata (UNMSM student), Johanna Cortéz (UNALM student), Lourdes Salinas (SPECS), & Emilia Garcia (SPECS)
  • Name conservation - a case for cultivars by Gordon D Rowley
  • My hybrids by Ray Horton
  • CactusTalk
  • Literature Review
Our cover this month supports the lithops theme at the start of a series of three articles dealing with newly described lithops by Keith Green. Front cover: a group of Lithops fulviceps seedlings, each up to 2.5cm diameter, demonstrating the great variation that is possible within this species, in common with most other lithops. The pale yellowish-green examples, which also flower white instead of yellow, equate to one of the older colour breaks that has been christened with the cultivar name Aurea, and is now raised from seed in significant quantities. Such variants occur spontaneously among naturally occurring populations, while other new forms may arise as a result of hybridisation, either in the wild or in cultivation. Thankfully, lithops are very obliging in being capable of being fixed by back-crossing, so that stable reproduction of unusual colours or patterns from seeds becomes possible after just a few generations. The scope for producing a race of very striking cultivars is immense, and yet to date we have barely begun to discover these often bizarrely-coloured, designer living-stones that could launch a new and very fashionable branch of the succulent hobby. Keith sets the scene for us by cataloguing and illustrating those that have recently been described formally and established (Photo: Roy Mottram)
     

Plant of the Month

Nov - 2017 Melocactus curvispinus

The genus Melocactus comprises just under 40 recognised species ............

1117 caesius small

More .....